Title: Response of fish communities to multiple pressures: development of a total anthropogenic pressure intensity index
Authors: POIKANE SANDRARITTERBUSCH DAVIDARGILLIER CHRISTINEBIALOKOZ WITOLDBLABOLIL PIETRBREINE JANJAARSMA NIKKOKRAUSE T.KUBEČKA JANLAURIDSEN TOBEN L.NOGES PEETERPEIRSON GRAEMEVIRBICKAS TOMAS
Citation: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT vol. 586 p. 502-511
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Publication Year: 2017
JRC N°: JRC105728
ISSN: 0048-9697
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969717302140
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC105728
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.01.211
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Lakes in Europe are subject to multiple anthropogenic pressures, such as eutrophication, habitat degradation and introduction of alien species, which are frequently inter-related. Therefore, effective assessment methods addressing multiple pressures are needed. In addition, these systems have to be harmonised (i.e. intercalibrated) to achieve common management objectives across Europe. Assessments of fish communities inform environmental policies on ecological conditions integrating the impacts of multiple pressures. However, the challenge is to ensure consistency in ecological assessments through time, across ecosystem types and across jurisdictional boundaries. To overcome the serious comparability issues between national assessment systems in Europe, a total anthropogenic pressure intensity (TAPI) index was developed as a weighted combination of the most common pressures in European lakes that is validated against 10 national fish-based water quality assessment systems using data from 556 lakes. Multi-pressure indices showed significantly higher correlations with fish indices than single-pressure indices. The best-performing index combines eutrophication, hydromorphological alterations and human use intensity of lakes. For specific lake types also biological pressures may constitute an important additional pressure. The best-performing index showed a strong correlation with eight national fish-based assessment systems. This index can be used in lake management for assessing total anthropogenic pressure on lake ecosystems and creates a benchmark for comparison of fish assessments independent of fish community composition, size structure and fishing-gear.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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