Title: Optimizing the delivery of multiple ecosystem goods and services in agricultural systems
Authors: TSIAFOULI MARIA A.DRAKOU EVANGELIA G.ORGIAZZI ALBERTOHEDLUND KATARINARITZ KARL
Citation: FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION vol. 5 p. 97
Publisher: FRONTIERS EDITORIAL OFFICE
Publication Year: 2017
JRC N°: JRC107661
ISSN: 2296-701X
URI: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fevo.2017.00097/full
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC107661
DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2017.00097
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Agricultural land is subjected to a variety of societal pressures, as demands for food, animal feed and biomass production increase, with an added requirement to simultaneously maintain natural areas, and mitigate climatic and environmental impacts globally (Tilman et al., 2002; Pretty 2008; Wang and Swallow, 2016). The biotic elements of agricultural systems interact with the abiotic environment to generate a number of ecosystem functions that offer services benefiting humans across many scales of time and space (Power, 2010; Swinton et al., 2007). The intensification of agriculture, particularly of that founded on fossil-fuel derived inputs, generally reduces biodiversity, including soil biodiversity (Tsiafouli et al. 2015) and impacts negatively upon a number of regulating and supporting ecosystem services (Zhang et al., 2007). There is a global need towards achieving sustainable agricultural systems, highlighted also in the UNs’ Sustainable Development Goals, where among their targets they state that by 2030 we should globally “ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality” (UN-DESA/DSD, 2014). There is hence an evident need for management regimes that enhance both agricultural production and the provision of multiple ecosystem services. The articles of this Research Topic enhance our knowledge of how management practices applied to agricultural systems affect the delivery of multiple ecosystem services and how trade-offs between provisioning, regulating and supporting ecosystem services can be handled both above- and below-ground, and across multiple scales of space and time. They also show the diversity of topics that need to be considered within the framework of ecosystem services delivered by agricultural systems, from knowledge on basic concepts and newly-proposed frameworks (§1), to a focus on specific ecosystem types such as grasslands and high nature-value farmlands (§2), pollinator habitats (§3) and soil habitats (§4).
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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