Title: Provision and Quality Assurance of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Europe
Authors: CORVELEYN AnniekMORRIS MichaelDEQUEKER ElisabethSERMON KarenDAVIES JamesANTINOLO GuillermoSCHMUTZLER AndreasVANECEK JiriNAGELS NickZIKA EleniPALAU FrancescIBARRETA RUIZ DOLORES
Editors: MORRIS Michael
Citation: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS vol. 16 no. 3 p. 290-299
Publisher: NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Publication Year: 2008
JRC N°: JRC35523
ISSN: 1018-4813
URI: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201976
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC35523
DOI: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201976
Type: Articles in Journals
Abstract: Background Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is now a well-established treatment and provided in many European countries. However, regulations, professional standards and accreditation requirements are often notably different. Furthermore, no comprehensive independent data exist about the practice and provision of PGD in Europe. Consequently, a European study was launched and aimed to obtain a currently lacking knowledge of the provision of PGD services and cross-border activities in Europe. Methods An online questionnaire was developed and sent to PGD providers and IVF professionals identified through ESHRE and EuroGentest. Additionally, expert opinions were obtained through interviews conducted with professionals in specific countries. Findings The survey identified 53 centres offering PGD from 17 European countries. There is a diversity of tests available and a general tendency towards the availability of custom-made tests, most commonly for extremely rare disorders. While half of the centres have a designated quality manager, just 33% have achieved or are preparing for accreditation or certification. About 66% of all centres responded that they did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) schemes, the problem being exacerbated by the current lack of existing PGD-specific schemes. Approximately 19% of the centres do not keep data on accuracy and 9% of centres do not even follow up until birth. Interpretation PGD is an expanding activity in Europe with increasing social implications (e.g. trans-border flow of couples). The survey highlighted a potential need for improvement in the overall quality system of PGD centres. In this respect, development of PGD-specific quality assessment schemes is gaining increasing importance. There is also a need to support monitoring of PGD treatment, especially systematic long-term follow-up, with increased public funding and international co-operation.
JRC Institute:Institute for Prospective Technological Studies

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