Title: Considerations for Proteomic Biomarkers in Rainbow Trout Ecotoxicology
Authors: SMITH Richard W.SALABERRIA IurgiCASH PhilPART PETER
Citation: Multiple Stressors: A Challenge for the Future - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Multipollution Exposure and Risk Assessment ­A Challenge for the Future, Minsk, Belarus, 1-5 October 2006 p. 263-269
Publisher: Springer
Publication Year: 2007
JRC N°: JRC40062
URI: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC40062
Type: Contributions to Conferences
Abstract: Abstract: The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is one of the most extensively researched and characterised species of fish. In addition its low tolerance to poor water quality has established it as one of the most useful sentinel species for aquatic toxicology. The subject of proteomics offers a potentially powerful approach to ecotoxicology, particularly with respect to providing biomarkers of environmental contamination. Therefore there is a valid rationale for combining this species with this experimental approach. However evidence exists that the rainbow trout liver proteome can be influenced by dietary composition. Furthermore individuals, within a trout population, are known to exhibit widely differing food consump¬tion rates and therefore growth. As a result there may be fundamental issues to consider before this combination can be fully exploited. Using the subject of endocrine disruption preliminary data are presented which dem¬onstrate that individual growth rates moderate the proteomic responses to the injection of a single dose of ~-estradio1. The injection dose is less than required to induce vitellogenin synthesis, the recognised endpoint of endo¬crine disruption, which suggests these proteomic changes may in fact be more sensitive biomarkers. This study therefore provides evidence and sug¬gested guidelines for proteomic toxicology in rainbow trout. The study also provides evidence that if these considerations are met proteomic changes in the trout liver could be a valuable addition to existing biological markers of aquatic contamination.
JRC Institute:Institute for Environment and Sustainability

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