Title: The JRC Method
Authors: HOOKER StanfordTHOMAS S. crystalVAN HEUKELEM LaurieSCHLUTER LouiseRUSS Mary E.RAS JosephineCLAUSTRE HervéCLEMENTSON LesleyCANUTI ElisabettaBERTHON Jean-FrancoisPERL JasonNORMANDEAU ClaireCULLEN JohnKIENAST MarkusPINCKNEY James L.
Publisher: Goddard Space Flight Center
Publication Year: 2010
JRC N°: JRC62930
URI: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC62930
Type: Articles in books
Abstract: Ten international laboratories specializing in the determination of marine pigment concentrations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were intercompared using in situ samples and a mixed pigment sample. Although prior Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Round-Robin Experiment (SeaHARRE) activities conducted in open-ocean waters covered a wide dynamic range in productivity, and some of the samples were collected in the coastal zone, none of the activities involved exclusively coastal samples. Consequently, SeaHARRE-4 was organized and executed as a strictly coastal activity and the field samples were collected from primarily eutrophic waters within the coastal zone of Denmark. The more restrictive perspective limited the dynamic range in chlorophyll concentration to approximately one and a half orders of magnitude (previous activities covered more than two orders of magnitude). The method intercomparisons were used for the following objectives: a) estimate the uncertainties in quantitating individual pigments and higher-order variables formed from sums and ratios; b) confirm if the chlorophyll a accuracy requirements for ocean color validation activities (approximately 25%, although 15% would allow for algorithm refinement) can be met in coastal waters; c) establish the reduction in uncertainties as a result of applying QA procedures; d) show the importance of establishing a properly defined referencing system in the computation of uncertainties; e) quantify the analytical benefits of performance metrics, and f) demonstrate the utility of a laboratory mix in understanding method performance. In addition, the remote sensing requirements for the in situ determination of total chlorophyll a were investigated to determine whether or not the average uncertainty for this measurement is being satisfied.
JRC Institute:Institute for Environment and Sustainability

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