Title: Overview on the detection, interpretation and reporting on the presence of unauthorised genetically modified materials : Guidance document from the European Network of GMO Laboratories (ENGL)
Authors: HOLST-JENSEN ArneBERTHEAU YvesALNUTT TheoBROLL HermannDE LOOSE MarcGROHMANN LutzHENRY ChristineHOUGS LiselotteMOENS WilliamMORISSET DanyOVESNA JaroslavaPECORARO SvenPLA MariaPRINS Theo W.SUTER DanielZHANG D.VAN DEN BULCKE MARCPLAN DAMIENVAN DEN EEDE Guy
Publisher: Publications Office of the European Union
Publication Year: 2011
JRC N°: JRC67297
ISBN: 978-92-79-21800-2
ISSN: 1831-9424
Other Identifiers: EUR 25008 EN
OPOCE LB-NA-25008-EN-N
URI: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC67297
DOI: 10.2788/89665
Type: EUR - Scientific and Technical Research Reports
Abstract: Unauthorised GMOs (UGM) and derived materials are not uncommon in products found on the European market. At present there is zero tolerance for UGM in the EU. In most documented cases, the UGM concentration relative to the product in which the UGM material is found, was low. Low level presence will always represent a challenge to analytically based detection, in particular if the UGM is obscured by other GM material. Analytical ad hoc implementation of the zero tolerance for particular UGMs in feed is described in Regulation (EU) No 619/2011. In Europe, GM detection is predominantly achieved with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) derived methods targeting the transgenic construct and insertion site DNA sequences. The increase in number and divergence of GMOs developed and commercialised has gradually forced the GM detection laboratories to rationalise their analytical work, and most laboratories now apply initial PCR based screenings followed by (when appropriate) more specific PCR based identification and quantification. The detection of any GM is dependent on availability of suitable detection method(s) and control materials to verify the performance of the method(s). Other information, e.g. describing the novel trait, introduced genetic elements, etc. may also facilitate detection, verification and identification of the GM. For UGM, this is a major challenge, and the GMOs are therefore classified into four knowledge groups in the present document. This classification may facilitate stakeholder communication and decision making in analytical laboratories. A decision tree is presented, summarising the recommended principles of GM and UGM detection. Notably, the state-of-the-art of GMO analysis is not static, and it is expected that the guidelines and recommendations presented in this document will have to be modified on a regular basis. Finally, the document highlights a number of R&D priorities and points out the need for reinforced information sharing at the global level.
JRC Institute:Institute for Health and Consumer Protection

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