Title: Next-generation Digital Earth
Authors: GOODCHILD MichaelGUO HuadongANNONI AlessandroBIAN LingDE BIE KeesCAMPBELL FrederickCRAGLIA MassimoEHLERS ManfredVAN GENDEREN JohnJACKSON DavinaLEWIS AnthonyPESARESI MartinoREMETEY-FULOPP GaborSIMPSON RichardSKIDMORE AndrewWANG ChanglinWOODGATE Peter
Citation: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA vol. 109 no. 28 p. 11088-11094
Publisher: NATL ACAD SCIENCES
Publication Year: 2012
JRC N°: JRC72904
ISSN: 0027-8424
URI: http://www.pnas.org/content/109/28/11088
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC72904
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1202383109
Type: Articles in Journals
Abstract: A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of “big data” has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public’s access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.
JRC Institute:Institute for Environment and Sustainability

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