Title: Rainfall Erosivity in Europe
Authors: PANAGOS PanagiotisBALLABIO CRISTIANOBORRELLI PASQUALEMEUSBURGER KatrinKLIK AndreasROUSSEVA SvetlaPERČEC TADIĆ MelitaMICHAELIDES SilasHRABALÍKOVÁ MichaelaOLSEN PrebenAALTO JuhoLAKATOS MonicaRYMSZEWICZ AnnaDUMITRESCU AlexandruBEGUERÍA SantiagoALEWELL Christine
Citation: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT vol. 511 p. 801-814
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Publication Year: 2015
JRC N°: JRC91126
ISSN: 0048-9697
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971500011X
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC91126
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.008
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1,541 precipitation stations in all European Union(EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 minutes. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 minutes using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression(GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1, with the highest values (>1,000 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.