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dc.contributor.authorMASCHERONI Giovannaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLIVINGSTONE Soniaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDREIER Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCHAUDRON STEPHANEen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-16T02:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-14en_GB
dc.date.available2016-12-16T02:04:39Z-
dc.date.created2016-12-06en_GB
dc.date.issued2016en_GB
dc.date.submitted2016-06-23en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2038-3002en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://riviste.erickson.it/med/it/2016/learning-versus-play-or-learning-through-play-how-parents-imaginaries-discourses-and-practices-around-icts-shape-childrens-digital-literacy-practices/en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC102261-
dc.description.abstractAs children access to the internet at ever younger ages, questions arise as to whether the use of touchscreens at home contributes to literacy and digital skills, and whether and how parents scaffold children’s learning. To date, research on parental mediation has shown that parental expectations of the role of ICTs in their children’s future, discourses of the opportunities and risks of the internet, and the everyday practices of media engagement all shape the ways in which children are socialised into using digital media at home. These expectations, worries and practices depend on parents’ education, socioeconomic background, and parenting culture. This article builds on prior research by the authors with 70 families in seven European countries. We compare lower income/less educated families and higher income/more educated families as they promote or hinder children’s (digital) literacy practices. We found that lower income families experience a generational digital divide and feel less confident in scaffolding children’s digital literacy practices. Instead, when parents use ICTs for work and/or are techno-enthusiasts, they are more engaged in children’s online activities irrespective of their background. The approach towards digital play - as either a vehicle or an impediment to children’s learning – is therefore indicative of different imaginaries around ICTs, different parenting styles and different mediation strategies.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipJRC.E.3-Cyber and Digital Citizens' Securityen_GB
dc.format.mediumOnlineen_GB
dc.languageENGen_GB
dc.publisherEdizioni Centro Studi Ericksonen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJRC102261en_GB
dc.titleLearning versus play or learning through play? How parents’ imaginaries, discourses and practices around ICTs shape children’s (digital) literacy practicesen_GB
dc.typeArticles in periodicals and booksen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.14605/MED721606en_GB
JRC Directorate:Space, Security and Migration

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