Title: Ecological bridges and barriers in pelagic ecosystems
Authors: BRISCOE DANAHOBDAY ALISTAIR J.CARLISLE AARONSCALES KYLIEEVESON PAIGEARRIZABALAGA HARITZDRUON JEAN-NOELFROMENTIN J.-M.
Citation: DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART II-TOPICAL STUDIES IN OCEANOGRAPHY vol. Deep–Sea Research Part II no. 140 p. 182-192
Publisher: PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Publication Year: 2017
JRC N°: JRC103901
ISSN: 0967-0645
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967064516303290
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC103901
DOI: 10.1016/j.dsr2.2016.11.004
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Many highly mobile species are known to use persistent pathways or corridors to move between habitat patches in which conditions are favorable for particular activities, such as breeding or foraging. In the marine realm, environmental variability can lead to the development of temporary periods of anomalous oceanographic conditions that can connect individuals to areas of habitat outside a population’s normal range, or alternatively, restrict individuals from areas usually within their range, thus acting as ecological bridges or ecological barriers. These temporary features can result in novel or irregular trophic interactions and changes in population spatial dynamics, and, therefore, have implications for management of marine ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence of ecological bridges and barriers in the marine realm, drawing upon five case studies in which particular oceanographic conditions have facilitated or restricted the movements of individuals from populations of HMS migratory species in different ocean regions. We discuss the potential population-level significance of ecological bridges and barriers, with respect to the life history characteristics of different species, and inter- and intra-population variability in habitat use. Finally, we discuss the persistence of bridge dynamics with time, our ability to monitor bridges and barriers in a changing climate, and implications for forecasting future climate-mediated ecosystem change.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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