Title: An integrated remote sensing and GIS approach for monitoring areas affected by selective logging: A case study in northern Mato Grosso, Brazilian Amazon
Authors: GRECCHI ROSANABEUCHLE RENE'SHIMABUKURO YOSIOARAGÃO LUIZ E. O. C.ARAI EGIDIOSIMONETTI DARIOACHARD FREDERIC
Citation: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATION AND GEOINFORMATION vol. 61 p. 70-80
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Publication Year: 2017
JRC N°: JRC104131
ISSN: 0303-2434
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0303243417300971
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC104131
DOI: 10.1016/j.jag.2017.05.001
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Forest cover disturbances due to processes such as logging and forest fires are a widespread issue especially in the tropics, and have heavily affected forest biomass and functioning in the Brazilian Amazon in the past decades. Satellite remote sensing has played a key role for assessing logging activities in this region; however, there are still remaining challenges regarding the quantification and monitoring of these processes affecting forested lands. In this study, we propose a new method for monitoring areas affected by selective logging, which is based on a combination of object-based and pixel-based classification approaches applied on remote sensing data. Logging intensity and changes over time are assessed within grid cells of 300m x 300m spatial resolution. Our method encompassed three main steps: (1) mapping forest/non-forest areas through an object-based approach applied to a temporal series of Landsat images during the period 2000-2015, (2) mapping yearly logging activities from soil fraction images on the same Landsat data series, and (3) integrating information from previous steps within a regular grid-cell of 300x300m in order to monitor logging intensities over this 15 years period. Our results indicate that annual forest disturbance rates, due to logging activities, were higher than annual deforestation rates during the whole period of study. The deforested areas correspond to circa 25% of the areas affected by forest disturbances. Deforestation rates were highest from 2001 to 2005 and then decreased considerably after 2006. In contrast, the annual forest disturbance rates show high temporal variability with a slow decrease over the 15-year period, resulting in a significant increase of the ratio between disturbed and deforested areas. Although the majority of the areas, which have been affected by selective logging during the period 2000-2014, were not deforested by 2015, more than 70% of the deforested areas in 2015 had been at least once identified as disturbed during that period.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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