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dc.contributor.authorSTANGE ERIKen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZULIAN GRAZIAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRUSCH GRACIELAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBARTON DAVIDen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNOWELL MEGANen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-02T01:17:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-31en_GB
dc.date.available2018-01-02T01:17:30Z-
dc.date.created2017-12-14en_GB
dc.date.issued2017en_GB
dc.date.submitted2017-08-25en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2367-8194en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://oneecosystem.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=14014&journal_name=oneecosystemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC107786-
dc.description.abstractPollinating insects are an integral part of cities’ natural capital and perform an important ecosystem function with a high degree of relevance to many cultural ecosystem services. Consequently, pollinators serve as a useful proxy for assessing urban biodiversity. Beekeeping has recently emerged as popular activity in many urban areas, and a good deal of the motivation for urban beekeeping for many stems from the cultural and non-consumptive aspects of beekeeping. Yet the recent increases in domestic honeybee densities in urban landscapes has raised concern regarding the potential threat that honeybees might pose to local populations of threatened bumblebee and solitary bee species. This issue constitutes a trade-o⓬ between the cultural ecosystem services associated with urban beekeeping and the regulation and maintenance ecosystem services of maintaining nursery populations of rare and threatened species. Municipal authorities in Oslo Norway have proposed establishing eight “precautionary zones”, within which placement of honeybee hives could be more strictly regulated. We propose a mapping and assessment approach for informing zoning decisions regarding urban honeybees, utilizing a model of an urban landscape’s biophysical capacity to support pollinating insects (ESTIMAP). Together with an additional model describing the approximate distrubtion of honeybees in Oslo, we identify areas in the city where domestic honeybees may be more likely to exhaust ⓔoral resources. This case also tests the policy relvance of ecosystem service mapping tools beyond awareness raising, with general lessons for ecosystem mapping and assessment more widely.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipJRC.D.3-Land Resourcesen_GB
dc.format.mediumOnlineen_GB
dc.languageENGen_GB
dc.publisherPensoften_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJRC107786en_GB
dc.titleEcosystem services mapping for municipal policy: ESTIMAP and zoning for urban beekeepingen_GB
dc.typeArticles in periodicals and booksen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.3897/oneeco.2.e14014en_GB
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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