Title: Risk of increased food insecurity under stringent global climate change mitigation policy
Authors: HASEGAWA TOMOKOFUJIMORI SHINICHIROHAVLIK PETRVALIN HUGOBODIRSKY BENJAMIN L.DOELMAN JONATHANFELLMANN THOMASKYLE PAGEKOOPMAN JASON F. L.LOTZE-CAMPEN HERMANNMASON-D'CROZ DANIELOCHI YUKIPEREZ DOMINGUEZ IGNACIOSTEHFEST ELKESULSER TIMOTHY B.TABEAU ANDRZEJTAKAHASHI KIYOSHITAKAKURA JUN'YAVAN MEIJL HANSVAN ZEIST WILLEM-JANWIEBE KEITH D.WITZKE HEINZ PETER
Citation: NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE vol. 8 p. 699-703
Publisher: NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Publication Year: 2018
JRC N°: JRC110841
ISSN: 1758-678X
URI: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC110841
DOI: 10.1038/s41558-018-0230-x
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Food insecurity can be directly exacerbated by climate change due to crop production-related impacts of warmer and drier conditions expected in important agricultural regions. However, efforts to mitigate climate change through comprehensive, economy-wide greenhouse gas emission reductions may also negatively affect food security, due to indirect impacts on prices and supplies of key agricultural commodities. Here we conduct a multiple model assessment on the combined effects of climate change and climate mitigation efforts on agricultural commodity prices, dietary energy availability, and the population at risk of hunger. A robust finding is that by 2050, stringent climate mitigation policy, if implemented evenly across all sectors and regions, would have a greater negative impact on global hunger and food consumption than the direct impacts of climate change. The negative impacts would be most prevalent in vulnerable low-income regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where food security problems are already acute.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.