Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGABOR BEKESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHARASZTOSI PETERen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T00:05:49Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-12en_GB
dc.date.available2020-05-13T00:05:49Z-
dc.date.created2019-10-08en_GB
dc.date.issued2020en_GB
dc.date.submitted2018-10-15en_GB
dc.identifier.citationREVIEW OF WORLD ECONOMICS vol. 156 no. 2 p. 343-375en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1610-2878 (online)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10290-019-00365-yen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC113542-
dc.description.abstractIn developing economies import can be the primary source of adopting new technologies and modern production equipment. Using a uniquely compiled Hungarian firm-level dataset, we investigated whether firms’ decision to import a specific machine is influenced by the local accumulation of experience in that same imported machine. Our results suggested that an additional local importer in the firm’s vicinity increases the probability of importing that particular machine considerably. Distance plays a key mediating role as firms, especially in small cities, learned mostly from neighboring peers. We also found that even within a type of imported machine, the source country of the product matters a great deal. Finally, the extent of spillover effects was found to vary a great deal both with respect to the importing firm as well as the composition of peers. Larger, foreign owned and internationalized firms are the ones that benefit from having importing firms in their vicinity, while small and domestically owned firms could actually be adversely affected by peer effects. Our results could be indicative for policy-makers interested in indirect impact of technology upgrade subsidy programs. We found that such indirect effects do exist. However, they are centered on large to large firm interactions. As smaller sized firms producing for the domestic market do not benefit much from import spillovers, policies aimed at helping such firms may not rely on these indirect effects.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipJRC.B.1-Finance and Economyen_GB
dc.format.mediumOnlineen_GB
dc.languageENGen_GB
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJRC113542en_GB
dc.titleMachine imports, technology adoption, and local spilloversen_GB
dc.typeArticles in periodicals and booksen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10290-019-00365-y (online)en_GB
JRC Directorate:Growth and Innovation

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.