Title: High-resolution melting of multiple barcode amplicons for plant species authentication
Authors: BALLIN NICOLAI ZEDERKOPFFOMAR ONAINDIA JONEJAWAD HADEELFERNANDEZ CARAZO RAFAELMAQUET ALAIN
Citation: FOOD CONTROL vol. 105 p. 141-150
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Publication Year: 2019
JRC N°: JRC115129
ISSN: 0956-7135 (online)
URI: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0956713519302300?via%3Dihub
https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC115129
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodcont.2019.05.022
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: In recent years, species identification in herbs has attracted considerable attention due to several cases of fraud; hence inexpensive high-throughput authentication methods are highly welcomed. Species authentication is often performed through DNA analysis and several specific regions (barcodes) are considered suitable. Each barcode (Bar) possesses different qualities in terms of universality and discrimination power. A multiplexed format where information can be extracted simultaneously from several barcode regions is seemingly appropriate to ensure the power of both universality and discrimination. In this approach, we amplified DNA from five different barcode regions in a multiplexed PCR format followed by high-resolution melting (HRM). This multiplexed Bar-HRM approach was first applied to plants spanning the plant kingdom and then gradually narrowing down the genetic variability within the Lamiaceae and the Solanaceae families to finally reach closely related cultivars. Universality was demonstrated through distinct melting profiles obtained for species originating from 29 different families spanning the angiosperms, gymnosperm, mosses, and liverwort (Marchantiophyta). Discrimination power was retained for species, sub-species, and a few cultivars through the application of multivariate statistics to the high-resolution melting profiles. This preliminary investigation has shown the potential to discriminate a vast amount of species within the whole plant kingdom. It requires no a priori knowledge of the species' DNA sequence and occurs in a closed system within 2.5 h at a reduced cost per sample compared to other DNA based approaches.
JRC Directorate:Health, Consumers and Reference Materials

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