Title: A human pluripotent carcinoma stem cell-based model for in vitrodevelopmental neurotoxicity testing: Effects of methylmercury, leadand aluminum evaluated by gene expression studies
Authors: LAURENZA IncoronataPALLOCCA GIORGIAMENNECOZZI MILENASCELFO BIBIANAPAMIES DavidPRICE Anna
Citation: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE vol. 31 no. 7 p. 679-691
Publisher: PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Publication Year: 2013
JRC N°: JRC74531
ISSN: 0736-5748
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0736574813000385
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC74531
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2013.03.002
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: The major advantage of the neuronal cell culture models derived from human stem cells is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment such as the commitment of human stem cells to the neuronal lineage and their subsequent stages of differentiation into neuronal and glial-like cell. In these studies we used mixed neuronal/glial culture derived from the NTERA-2 (NT-2) cell line, which has been established from human pluripotent testicular embryonal carcinoma cells. After the characterization of the different stages of cell differentiation into neuronal- and glial-like phenotype toxicity studies were performed to evaluate whether this model would be suitable for developmental neurotoxicity studies. The cells were exposed during the differentiation process to non-cytotoxic concentrations of methylmercury chloride, lead chloride and aluminum nitrate for two weeks. The toxicity then was evaluated by measuring the mRNA levels of cell specific markers (neuronal and glial) in the control culture and in the cells exposed to the compounds. The obtained results suggest that lead chloride and aluminum nitrate at low concentrations were toxic primary to astrocytes and at the higher concentrations it also induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, MetHgCl was toxic for both cell types, neuronal and glial, as mRNA specific for astrocytes and neuronal markers were affected. The obtained results suggest that neuronal mixed culture derived from human NT2 precursor cells is a suitable model for developmental neurotoxicity studies and gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening of the potential neurotoxic compounds.
JRC Directorate:Institute for Health and Consumer Protection Historical Collection

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.