Title: Household Cooking with Solid Fuels Contributes to Ambient PM2.5 Air Pollution and the Burden of Disease
Authors: CHAFE ZoёBRAUER MichaelKLIMONT ZbigniewVAN DINGENEN RitaMEHTA SumiRAO ShilpaRIAHI KeywanDENTENER FranciscusSMITH Kirk
Citation: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES vol. 122 no. 12 p. 1314-1320
Publisher: US DEPT HEALTH HUMAN SCIENCES PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE
Publication Year: 2013
JRC N°: JRC76559
ISSN: 0091-6765
URI: http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1206340/
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC76559
DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1206340
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Approximately 2.8 billion people cook with solid fuels, and research has focused on the health impacts of household exposures to fine particulate (PM2.5). Here, as part of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease project, we evaluate the impact of household cooking with solid fuels on regional ambient PM2.5 pollution. We estimated the proportion of ambient PM2.5 (APM2.5) from PM2.5-cooking for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 in 176 countries, and use these to estimate ambient concentrations of PM2.5 attributable to household cooking with solid fuels (PM2.5-cooking). We used an energy supply-driven emissions model (GAINS) to calculate the fraction of total household PM2.5 emissions produced by cooking with solid fuels, by country. These findings were multiplied by the proportion of total APM2.5 attributable to household emissions, as calculated with the source-receptor model TM5-FASST, to obtain the proportion of total APM2.5 from PM2.5-cooking. In 2010, the proportion of APM2.5 from PM2.5-cooking ranged from 0% of total APM2.5 in six higher-income regions, to 44% (8 µg/m3 of 18 µg/m3 16 total) in Southern sub-Saharan Africa. PM2.5-cooking constituted >10% of APM2.5 in eight regions with 4 billion people, with a global mean of 14%. Globally, the mean population-weighted outdoor air pollution contribution of household cooking was 4 µg/m3 , with the highest contribution of 10 µg/m3 in South Asia. We conclude that PM2.5 emissions from household cooking constitute an important portion of APM2.5 concentrations in many regions, including India and China. Efforts to improve ambient air quality will be hindered if household cooking conditions are not addressed.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.