Title: Single tree biomass modelling using airborne laser scanning
Authors: KANKARE VilleRÄTY MINNAYU XiaoweiHOLOPAINEN MarkusVASTARANTA MikkoKANTOLA TuulaHYYPPÄ JuhaHYYPPÄ HannuALHO PetteriVIITALA Risto
Citation: ISPRS JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING vol. 85 p. 66-73
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Publication Year: 2013
JRC N°: JRC86164
ISSN: 0924-2716
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924271613001986
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC86164
DOI: 10.1016/j.isprsjprs.2013.08.008
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: Accurate forest biomass mapping methods would provide the means for e.g. detecting bioenergy potential, biofuel and forest-bound carbon. The demand for practical biomass mapping methods at all forest levels is growing worldwide, and viable options are being developed. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a promising forest biomass mapping technique, due to its capability of measuring the three-dimensional forest vegetation structure. The objective of the study was to develop new methods for tree-level biomass estimation using metrics derived from ALS point clouds and to compare the results with field references collected using destructive sampling and with existing biomass models. The study area was located in Evo, southern Finland. ALS data was collected in 2009 with pulse density equalling approximately 10 pulses/m2. Linear models were developed for the following tree biomass components: total, stem wood, living branch and total canopy biomass. ALS-derived geometric and statistical point metrics were used as explanatory variables when creating the models. The total and stem biomass root mean square error per cents equalled 26.3% and 28.4% for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), and 36.8% and 27.6% for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.), respectively. The results showed that higher estimation accuracy for all biomass components can be achieved with models created in this study compared to existing allometric biomass models when ALS-derived height and diameter were used as input parameters. Best results were achieved when adding field-measured diameter and height as inputs in the existing biomass models. The only exceptions to this were the canopy and living branch biomass estimations for spruce. The achieved results are encouraging for the use of ALS-derived metrics in biomass mapping and for further development of the models.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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