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dc.contributor.authorCASTELLANI Valentinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSALA SERENELLAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMIRABELLA Nadiaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-16T00:04:38Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-15en_GB
dc.date.available2015-07-16T00:04:38Z-
dc.date.created2015-07-07en_GB
dc.date.issued2015en_GB
dc.date.submitted2014-04-11en_GB
dc.identifier.citationINTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT vol. 11 no. 3 p. 373–382en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1551-3777en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ieam.1614/abstracten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC89878-
dc.description.abstractSustainable consumption in the context of circular economy is seen as the antithesis of current consumption patterns, which are characterized in terms of the so-called “throwaway society”. Reuse may provide an excellent, environmentally preferred alternative to other waste management methods, because it promotes resource efficiency and reduces air, water and soil pollution. In the present study, we propose a methodology for the appraisal of environmental benefits related to reuse adopting life cycle assessment (LCA). A case study on a second hand shop is presented and avoided impacts quantified. The methodology consists of two main phases: i) calculation of average avoided impacts for one unit of reused product in each product category considered and ii) calculation of the cumulative avoided impacts generated during one year by the second hand shop. Inventory data were taken both from literature, and directly from sales and survey submitted to customers. The proposed methodology proved to be useful in order to evaluate comprehensively the environmental benefits of reuse of goods, through a standardized procedure based on the identification of reference products for each product category that has to be evaluated, in order to be able to collect reliable inventory data and to perform an LCA. The higher contribution to avoided impacts comes from the apparel sector, due to the high amount of items sold, followed by the furniture sector, due to the high amount of environmental impacts avoided by the reuse of each single item.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipJRC.H.8-Sustainability Assessmenten_GB
dc.format.mediumPrinteden_GB
dc.languageENGen_GB
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJRC89878en_GB
dc.titleBeyond the throwaway society: life cycle base assessment of the environmental benefit of reuseen_GB
dc.typeArticles in periodicals and booksen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ieam.1614en_GB
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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