Title: Current approaches and future role of high content imaging in safety sciences and drug discovery
Authors: VAN VLIET ErwinDANESIAN MardasBeilmann M.DAVIES AnthonyFAVA EugenioFLECK RolandJULÉ YvonKANSY ManfredKUSTERMANN StefanMACKO PeterMUNDY WilliamROTH AdrianSHAH ImranUTENG MarianneVAN DE WATER BobHartung T.LEIST Marcel
Citation: ALTEX-ALTERNATIVES TO ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION vol. 31 no. 4 p. 479-493
Publisher: SPEKTRUM AKADEMISCHER VERLAG-SPRINGER-VERLAG GMBH
Publication Year: 2014
JRC N°: JRC90194
ISSN: 1868-596X
URI: http://www.altex.ch/resources/altex_2014_4_479_493_T4WRVliet1.pdf
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC90194
DOI: 10.14573/altex.1405271
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: High content imaging combines automated microscopy with image analysis approaches to simultaneously quantify multiple phenotypic and/or functional parameters in biological systems. The technology has become an important tool in the fields of safety sciences and drug discovery, because it can be used for mode-of-action identification, determination of hazard potency and the discovery of toxicity targets and biomarkers. In contrast to conventional biochemical endpoints, high content imaging provides insight into the spatial distribution and dynamics of responses in biological systems. This allows the identification of signaling pathways underlying cell defense, adaptation, toxicity and death. Therefore high content imaging is considered a promising technology to address the challenges for the Toxicity testing in the 21st century approach. Currently high content imaging technologies are frequently applied in academia for mechanistic toxicity studies and in pharmaceutical industry for the ranking and selection of lead drug compounds or to identify/confirm mechanisms underlying effects observed in vivo. A recent workshop gathered scientists working on high content imaging in academia, pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies with the objective to compile the state-of-the-art of the technology in the different institutions. They defined technical and methodological gaps, addressed the need for quality control, suggested control compounds and acceptance criteria, highlighted cell sources and new readouts and discussed future requirements for regulatory implementation. This review summarizes the discussion, proposed solutions and recommendations of the specialists contributing to the workshop.
JRC Directorate:Institute for Health and Consumer Protection Historical Collection

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.