Title: Chapter 1.1 - Ocean Climate and Satellite Optical Radiometry
Authors: YODER JIMCASEY KENNETHDOWELL MARK
Citation: EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES vol. 47 p. 3-12
Publisher: ACADEMIC PRESS
Publication Year: 2014
JRC N°: JRC91640
ISSN: 1079-4042 (online)
URI: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124170117000027?via%3Dihub
https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC91640
DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-417011-7.00002-7
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: There is a growing consensus among global policymakers to accept the conclusions of the scientific community that the Earth and its Ocean are warming, with consequences to ecosystems around the world. Satellite radiometers are one of the most important tools for measuring changes in global ocean temperatures, as well as changes in key biogeochemical parameters, such as phytoplankton chlorophyll-a and particulate carbon. This chapter first describes the rigorous requirements established by the Global Climate Observing System for radiometric measurements for sea surface temperature, and ocean color radiometry to determine oceanic trends. This description is followed by a brief discussion outlining the steps that are required to meet those requirements with details provided in the following chapters. Finally, it is emphasized that sustaining calibrated time series indefinitely into the future across multiple satellite missions is too much for a single space agency or single nation. International organizations now exist to describe and advocate for the type of international cooperation that is required to provide the long records of calibrated satellite radiometric measurements of the ocean that are critical to understanding changes in the physical and biogeochemical state of the ocean.
JRC Directorate:Sustainable Resources

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