Title: ECCC TEST PROGRAMME AND DATA ASSESSMENT ON GTD111 CREEP RUPTURE, STRAIN AND DUCTILITY
Authors: ALLEN DavidHOLMSTROM BJORNDE BRUYCKER EvyKEUSTERMANS J-PKOLKMAN H.MESSELIER-GOUZE C.VACCHIERI E.GOMES M.
Citation: Proceedings of 3rd International ECCC- Creep & Fracture Conference
Publisher: CSM, Rome
Publication Year: 2014
JRC N°: JRC92105
ISBN: 978-88-7484-380-0
URI: http://eccc.c-s-m.it/
http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC92105
Type: Articles in periodicals and books
Abstract: GTD111, a creep resistant Ni-based superalloy developed by GE, is widely used in land-based gas turbine first stage blades. However, there is little published information on its creep properties and microstructure. The European Creep Collaborative Committee (ECCC) Working Group 3C consequently selected GTD111 as a model material for testing and complementary data assessment. The aim of this paper is to present the results from the ECCC test program and data assessment, and to compare equiaxed (EA) and directionally solidified (DS) material performance. Testing and metallographic laboratories from six European nations collaborated to produce strain monitored creep rupture data on four EA and DS materials out to beyond 10,000 hours within a wide range of temperatures, 850-950°C, and stresses, 293-99 MPa. Available (generally short term) results from other sources were also included in the compiled, small but viable, 51-test data set. Assessment was carried out by three different assessors using different tools and adopting different prediction models. Conventional ECCC post-assessment techniques and novel “back-fitting” methods were used to identify a preferred model. It was shown that assessing all the EA and DS data together can lead to non-conservative predictions for EA materials, but separating the two classes creates small data subsets which cannot be modelled effectively. As a pragmatic compromise, the DS data and those EA data which also showed good ductility were included in a final "ductile GTD111" assessment. The resulting creep rupture material models and rupture strength predictions are presented up to 3 times the longest test duration. It was then shown that the performance of lower ductility EA materials can also be predicted effectively with the "ductile" model by truncating the rupture time at the measured fracture strain. For this exercise, a creep strain model based on rupture and time to strain data was fitted. In parallel, microstructural examination was performed to characterize the damage modes involved in the low ductility failures. It was thereby shown that the creep rupture strength shortfall of an EA material compared to its DS equivalent is not a constant factor, but is primarily governed by the reduced creep ductility. Hence, the shortfall varies between different EA casts, and tends to become greater in the longer term.
JRC Directorate:Energy, Transport and Climate

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