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dc.contributor.authorWEZIAK-BIALOWOLSKA DOROTAen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-25T01:24:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-23en_GB
dc.date.available2016-12-25T01:24:15Z-
dc.date.created2016-10-10en_GB
dc.date.issued2016en_GB
dc.date.submitted2015-12-01en_GB
dc.identifier.citationPUBLIC HEALTH vol. 139 p. 161-169en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0033-3506en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2016.06.028en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC98792-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Although there is strong uptake of active or passive engagement with the cultural and creative activities as determinants of individual health and well-being, few population studies report any causal influence on self-reported and physical health or life satisfaction from engagement with the arts (playing an instrument or singing, painting, sculpture) or passive cultural participation (attending the cinema, theatre, opera and exhibitions). This study set out to investigate any potential derived benefits to the Swiss population. Material and methods: The 2010 and 2013 waves of the Swiss Household Panel study were used for analysis. The data are representative for the Swiss population aged over 14 with respect to major demographic variables. Using longitudinal data, the strengths of the two approaches to evaluating causal inference were simultaneously applied: propensity score matching (PSM) and difference-in-differences (DID). PSM attempted to eliminate selection bias by conditioning on confounding variables. DID estimator was applied to remove unobserved fixed effects via intra-individual comparisons over time by comparing the trends in a matched treatment and control group. Results: The study showed that cultural activity – of any type, passive or active – did not seem to have any causative influence on health and well-being. Results showed that long-term health and well-being did not improve significantly as a result of any specific activity in the cultural arena. Conclusions: The investigation provided little evidence to justify health promotion messages for involvement with the arts. Nevertheless, these findings do not contest that active or passive participation in cultural and arts related activities may be beneficial to health and well-being when guided by qualified therapists to treat specific health-related problems.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipJRC.I.1-Modelling, Indicators and Impact Evaluationen_GB
dc.format.mediumOnlineen_GB
dc.languageENGen_GB
dc.publisherW B SAUNDERS CO LTDen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJRC98792en_GB
dc.titleAttendance of cultural events and involvement with the arts– impact evaluation on health and well-being from a Swiss household panel surveyen_GB
dc.typeArticles in periodicals and booksen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.puhe.2016.06.028en_GB
JRC Directorate:Joint Research Centre Corporate Activities

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